Cameron Clarke becomes fulltime member of the Sangberg team

Sangberg Architects has hired Cameron Clarke, newly educated architect from KADK, as a fulltime employee. We asked Cameron to tell us a bit about his final project at KADK and what makes Sangberg Architects an interesting workplace through Cameron’s eyes.

Before British Cameron Clarke came to Denmark a few years ago to study a master’s in architecture at KADK, he had obtained a bachelor’s degree from The Sheffield School of Architecture in the UK, after which he went to London and worked at an architectural practice for 5 years. Now Cameron has graduated from the programme ‘Urbanism and Societal Change’ at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Architecture (KADK) in Copenhagen – a master’s programme that focuses on larger scale city planning as well as challenges at an architectural scale.

I was fascinated by the extraordinary rate of change that you find everywhere in China. Architecturally the brand new is built right up against the ancient, and this makes for an incredibly complex urban life

“Close to Home” – inspired by the simplicity of lightweight and small-scale Chinese architecture

For his thesis graduation project, Cameron went to Xicheng, a neighbourhood in the centre of Beijing, China, as he through several visits to China had developed an interest in the complexity of the Chinese architecture: “Over the last 2 years I have travelled from Copenhagen to Beijing a number of times, and I was fascinated by the extraordinary rate of change that you find everywhere in China. Architecturally the brand new is built right up against the ancient, and this makes for an incredibly complex urban life which is constantly forcing people to change how they live their lives.”

my project explored how healthcare facilities from a network of smaller, contextual and lightweight architecture could locate treatment closer to patients’ homes and communities

Cameron’s trips to Beijing were the foundation for his graduation project called “Close to Home”, where he investigated the impact that this change has had on the mental wellbeing of local citizens in Xicheng. With inspiration from adaptable vernacular architecture of the traditional ‘Hutong’ neighbourhoods – and the similarity to the traditional simple timber architecture still found in the Danish countryside – Cameron worked towards designing an alternative system of mental healthcare facilities.

“Currently in China the only limited mental healthcare facilities are located in huge hospitals on the outsides of the cities, forcing already vulnerable patients to leave their local social and support networks. Rather than this approach, my project explored how healthcare facilities from a network of smaller, contextual and lightweight architecture could locate treatment closer to patients’ homes and communities,” Cameron explains.

A professional match

At Sangberg, we are very pleased to now have Cameron as a fulltime employee, and we asked him why Sangberg to him is an interesting place to work: “I’m excited to be working for Sangberg because of the range of scales that the company works with from carefully crafted individual buildings to urban masterplans and strategic thinking. I mostly admire architecture that is light in its use of materials and creates beautiful spaces without needing to be expensive or exclusive. I think Sangberg’s strategy reflects this appreciation, and so I’m looking forward to learning from this philosophy and how the company makes projects.”

Welcome on board to Cameron. We look forward to benefit from his creative thinking and ways of forming architecture, and we are sure Cameron will be as much of an inspiration to us as we hopefully can be to him.

“Close to Home” was awarded the 2019 KADK United Nations Scholarship.
Read more about Cameron’s thesis project at KADK’s website.